How pig farmers can get started with environmental commodities

Pig farmers can take action to reduce GHGs


10 August 2022


2 minute read

Since the recent passage of the US Growing Climate Solutions Act (GCSA), pig farmers in the United States are looking for more ways to help the world’s environment become and remain sustainable.

Pig farmers have asked us how they can put these ideas into practice so they can take action to reduce greenhouse gases (GHGs) too. Below we’ve provided some concrete ways to get started with sustainable agriculture or selling carbon credits.

How pig farmers can get started with sustainable agriculture

Swine farmers can specifically get involved with sustainable agriculture by putting into practice something as simple as managing pig manure.

  • Specialized feed – Manure emissions can be reduced by pig feed with seaweed in it which can improve gut health and reduce overall manure while also improving animal health and reducing antibiotics.
  • Better manure transportation – Pig manure can also be transported with a covering of straw which keeps excess gases from being released into the air. Manure should be covered by at least 15 cm of straw to allow oxygen for microbes that can break down the methane.
  • Anaerobic digesters – A digester can reduce production of methane by up to 60% – and it also helps reduce odor.
  • Wind and solar power adoption – Swine farmers should also consider adding wind turbines and solar panels in areas on their farms. Open farmland can accommodate windmills with little impact to the land available for other purposes and solar panels can be added to barn and shelter roofs.

How farmers can sequester carbon and make money at the same time

Single.Earth is a digital asset company that was founded to encourage landowners like farmers to leave their land wild. For every 100 kg of carbon stored, pig farmers get a Merit token. These tokens can then be used to buy products and services or simply be converted into cash.

The project is in its beginning stages, but landowning farmers can sign up early on Single.Earth’s website.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *