Recipe Unlimited (TSE:RECP) shareholders have endured a 47% loss from investing in the stock three years ago

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As an investor its worth striving to ensure your overall portfolio beats the market average. But in any portfolio, there are likely to be some stocks that fall short of that benchmark. We regret to report that long term Recipe Unlimited Corporation (TSE:RECP) shareholders have had that experience, with the share price dropping 48% in three years, versus a market return of about 47%. And the ride hasn’t got any smoother in recent times over the last year, with the price 38% lower in that time. Furthermore, it’s down 18% in about a quarter. That’s not much fun for holders. This could be related to the recent financial results – you can catch up on the most recent data by reading our company report.

With that in mind, it’s worth seeing if the company’s underlying fundamentals have been the driver of long term performance, or if there are some discrepancies.

See our latest analysis for Recipe Unlimited

While the efficient markets hypothesis continues to be taught by some, it has been proven that markets are over-reactive dynamic systems, and investors are not always rational. One way to examine how market sentiment has changed over time is to look at the interaction between a company’s share price and its earnings per share (EPS).

Recipe Unlimited saw its EPS decline at a compound rate of 10% per year, over the last three years. This reduction in EPS is slower than the 20% annual reduction in the share price. So it seems the market was too confident about the business, in the past.

The graphic below depicts how EPS has changed over time (unveil the exact values by clicking on the image).

earnings-per-share-growth

We know that Recipe Unlimited has improved its bottom line lately, but is it going to grow revenue? Check if analysts think Recipe Unlimited will grow revenue in the future.

A Different Perspective

While the broader market gained around 8.5% in the last year, Recipe Unlimited shareholders lost 38%. Even the share prices of good stocks drop sometimes, but we want to see improvements in the fundamental metrics of a business, before getting too interested. Regrettably, last year’s performance caps off a bad run, with the shareholders facing a total loss of 7% per year over five years. We realise that Baron Rothschild has said investors should “buy when there is blood on the streets”, but we caution that investors should first be sure they are buying a high quality business. I find it very interesting to look at share price over the long term as a proxy for business performance. But to truly gain insight, we need to consider other information, too. Consider for instance, the ever-present spectre of investment risk. We’ve identified 3 warning signs with Recipe Unlimited (at least 1 which is a bit unpleasant) , and understanding them should be part of your investment process.

If you like to buy stocks alongside management, then you might just love this free list of companies. (Hint: insiders have been buying them).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on CA exchanges.

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This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using an unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.